Not Just Humans, Cats Can Catch Corona Too

Not Just Humans, Cats Can Catch Corona Too

Not Just Humans, Cats Can Catch Corona Too – The recent Corona outbreak has created such an uproar, especially with all the spread and quarantines in Chinese neighboring countries. However, it is not exactly – the Coronavirus was actually found affecting bats before humans. If that’s the case, can it affect your cats as well?
• The Origin of Corona Virus
While there is no exact recording of the earliest existence of the Coronavirus. However, it is not exactly new – studies had found the virus on several animal species, including bats and pangolins. Then, the virus mutated to several other animals including pets such as dogs.

In fact, there are also records of human infection a few decades back. They are not reported publicly since the infection only reached several people and they were able to be quarantined successfully. In Wuhan, where the new mutation of Corona Virus COVID-19 was reported an outbreak last year, the virus itself was reported to be around for 20 years and that is even long before we know.

• What about Cats?
Now we know that Corona mutates and indiscriminately infect human the way online gambling games in sbobet infected many active gambling players. However, the new mutation (COVID-19) only affects humans. So, cats shouldn’t be able to catch it and no new mutation had been reported so far.

However, just like dogs, cats actually can be infected with a Corona mutation that only affects felines – Feline Corona Virus (FCoV). Though mutated from the same virus, this particular mutation spread using infected feces, different with COVID-19 that spreads airborne. If a cat is infected with FCoV, the virus will develop into Feline Infectious Peritonitis which inflames their digestion organs and may cause death.

• Is It Curable?
Just like the COVID-19, FCoV is currently studied by researchers around the world. However, as the existence of FCoV is significantly longer than COVID-19, it has more existing studies. There is even a vaccine for the virus. However, the use is still controversial and it is only available in the US and several European countries. Otherwise, it is still deemed incurable and can cause fatal death.

However, since we know the source (infected feces), we can prevent our feline friend from getting infected by regularly cleaning their litter box as good as possible especially if you have several cats and they share a litterbox together. General hygiene should be improved as well to prevent an ‘outbreak’ in the house.

Yes, cats can catch Corona. However, the virus is different from the recent epidemic – Feline Coronavirus had existed for a long time and has a cure. For the time being, there is no news on another mutation of the COVID-19 that possibly animals. So, it’s safe to say that your feline friends will not be affected by the outbreak, at least.

Can Your Cats Catch The Corona Outbreak?
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Can Your Cats Catch The Corona Outbreak?

Can Your Cats Catch The Corona Outbreak? – Ever since the news of Wuhan isolation spread throughout the world, people became more and more wary of the Coronavirus. As pet-owners, you may have worried about the epidemic beyond yourself because Corona is reportedly found on animals such as pangolins and bats first. Is it possible for the outbreak to affect your cats?

• Can Corona Infect Felines?
Yes, but not the Corona mutation from the latest outbreak. As it was first found in bats and pangolins, it’s not questionable if the virus can affect other animals. In fact, it reportedly affects common pets such as cats and dogs for several decades now. Cats, in particular, can get infected by a mutation called FCoV or Feline Corona Virus the way we are infected by the fun online poker games in https://citipoker88.online.

The latest found mutation, COVID-19, is different from the FCoV. According to Express (13/2), Corona will not be able to affect animals after it mutates to affect humans. As COVID-19 happens to only infect humans and have no newer reported mutation, it is safe to say that no animals will be infected by the newly mutated virus. This, however, doesn’t mean your cat is safe from FCoV.

• How Does FCoV Infect Cats?
Another good news about FCoV is that it is unlikely to cause an outbreak compared to COVID-19. After all, instead of being totally infectious and being airborne, it spreads through contacts with infected feces.

In other words, cats will only be infected FCoV only if Corona inhibits then mutates in their body or they can get a secondhand infection from other infected cats’ feces. As long as your cats are indoors and not infected before you adopt them, they should be safe from FCoV. However, once they are infected, the effects may be fatal as it causes Feline Infectious Peritonitis – a deadly disease that inflames cats’ digestion organs.

• Are There Any Research and Cure?
Many research had been conducted globally concerning FCoV. For one, NCBI published a research paper on FCoV immunization. Vaccine for the virus also reportedly available in several European countries and America. Sadly, said vaccine has controversies, which means the disease is not officially curable. The best pet-owners can do is cleaning litterbox on a regular basis to avoid the infection.

So, will your cats get caught in the outbreak? So far, there’s no evidence of any feline infection. However, they may catch FCoV (Feline Corona Virus), a corona mutation that affects cats. Just like COVID-19, the feline-infecting virus has yet to have a real cure. However, since it is not airborne, you can prevent the infection by cleaning the litterbox regularly.

Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus that Affects Cats
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Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus that Affects Cats

Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus that Affects Cats – Playing with cats is fun for lovers of these cute four-legged animals. Cats with cute fur and faces provide a special delight for their caregivers. However, cat lovers seem to always have to be available about the medical conditions experienced by cats that are kept. Cats are also vulnerable to disease attacks that endanger the cat and the owner. One of the diseases that easily attacks cats is Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP). This cat disease is an infectious disease caused by a virus known as the Feline Coronavirus (FcoV). This virus belongs to the group of viruses that are easily mutated. This virus consists of Feline Enteric Coronavirus and Feline Infectious Peritonitis which have the same genetic basis but can cause different effects in cats that have been infected with this virus.

Feline Infectious Peritonitis usually affects macrophage and monocytes infections. This disease makes the cat does not last long in the digestive system, resulting in the scarcity of discovery in their feces. There is a small risk of transmitting the disease to other cats so isolation is not necessary to cats infected with this virus. Of the various cases in cats infected with this disease, cats with an age range between 3 months to 3 years are susceptible to this disease. There are also many cat breeds that are susceptible to this disease such as Abyssinian, Birman, Ragdoll Rex, Himalayan and Bengal. What triggers this disease to infect cats are several factors such as stress, genetic and viral Feline Leukemia Virus and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus.

Symptoms commonly found in cats suffering from this disease include lethargy, weight loss that dropped dramatically, anorexia, fever with rising and falling temperatures, jaundice and abnormal growth in kittens. Feline Infectious Peritonitis usually shows symptoms such as fluid retention in the abdominal cavity and others so that the organs in the cat do not function and develop as they should. Some of the symptoms that show cats with this disease are from the eyes such as changes in pupillary shape, changes in iris color and others. Symptoms of the central nervous system can include seizures, ataxia, tremors, depression, behavior changes and many others. Diarrhea, vomiting, colitis and the like provide symptoms that are in the gastrointestinal.

To keep your cat from getting this disease, you need to immediately bring your pet cat to the vet to immediately give a thorough diagnosis to your pet cat. If your cat is infected with this disease, you can provide some treatments such as antiviral administration, but until now unfortunately there has been no effective treatment in treating cats from Feline Infectious Peritonitis.

What Recent Research Says About Feline Infectious Peritonitis of Cats
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What Recent Research Says About Feline Infectious Peritonitis of Cats

What Recent Research Says About Feline Infectious Peritonitis of Cats – Coronavirus (COVID19) has become a threat to everyone. There is currently no medication for this disease. It becomes worse because nowadays, people are overshadowed with Feline Infectious Peritonitis or FIP in wild and domestic cats. The disease is not new and some researches have been done to find out more about this disease and how it can be a threat to both cats and the owners.

– What Feline Infectious Peritonitis Is
Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) is a disease that usually attacks cats like online gambling games in https://citibet88.club cause playing fever among players. The disease can be fatal to cats, especially kittens below two years. The root of this disease is actually from Feline Enteric Coronavirus (FECV) and FIP has complicated pathogenesis. In research in 2019, it is noted that only around 39% of cats can survive after the experimental infection.

Another research also states that any cat can develop FIP when they are infected with the corona virus, the popular virus people talk. The research also shows that not only cat below two years, but also older can also develop the disease, especially when they are already infected with feline leukemia virus or FeLV as well as geriatric cats.

The cats can get the disease through cat-to-cat contact and constant exposure to feces. Although you have cleaned the surroundings, the virus is still alive in the environment for up to several weeks. If the cat with FIP is pregnant, it will be likely that the kitten will get the disease as well, especially if they are still around five to eight weeks old.

– Symptoms and Treatment for Feline Infectious Peritonitis
The symptoms of this disease are quite ambiguous because each cat can have different symptoms compared to other cats with the same disease. The most common symptoms are nasal discharge, watery eyes, and sneezing. But, some cats may also get diarrhea and mild intestinal disease. The problem here is that the simple test for FIP is not developed well and the result cannot show an exact strain of feline coronavirus that might not be the one that causes FIP. Because the symptoms are quite hard to detect, the current researches haven’t found the best cure for this disease. The current researches still find the best medication that will slow down the rapid growth of the disease.

There is no medication for this disease at the moment, and it is quite hard to detect the symptoms in cats. And, if it is late to treat, it will become Feline Coronavirus that will be dangerous for your cats.

Knowing More about Feline Coronavirus
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Knowing More about Feline Coronavirus

Feline coronavirus (FCoV) is a virus that is infectious to cats all around the world. It is of positive-stranded RNA type and is part of the Alphacoronavirus 1 species of the Alphacoronavirus genus, under the Coronaviridae family.

Alphacoronavirus 1 is a species group, to which the canine coronavirus (CCoV) belongs as well as the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV). The feline coronavirus has two forms: the feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) infects the intestines and the feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) causes the FIP (feline infectious peritonitis). Healthy cats typically shed feces containing feline coronavirus. The virus is then transmitted to other cats via fecal-oral route. The virus is transmitted in a higher rate in an environment with multiple cats more than that with single cat. In the beginning, the virus is much less benign until it mutates from FECV to FIPV. The resulting condition from this infection, the Feline Infectious Peritonitis, is fatal and has no known cure while the treatment for it is given based on outward, observable symptoms and is generally palliative in its nature.

The mature gastrointestinal epithelial cells are infected by feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). This infection has very little outward signs and is typically chronic. The virus is shed in the feces and is detectable by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the feces. Some cats are naturally resistant to the virus, which can prevent infection and perhaps turn said cat into a carrier. FECV mutates into feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) when a virus that is infecting an enterocyte undergoes random errors.

During their natural, pre-domestication state, cats are solitary. They do not share any kind of spaces with one another so the spread of infection is minimal. Epidemiological risk of mutation is in much higher rate within domestic cats living in a group. After mutating, the FCoV obtains a tropism for macrophages while they lose their intestinal tropism. When macrophages are infected by FIPV, a fatal granulomatous vasculitis, which then develops into Feline Infectious Peritonitis, is developed.

Feline infectious peritonitis is developed depending on two factors: the mutation of the virus and low immunity. Virus mutation, in turn, depends on the rate at which FECV mutates to FIPV. Meanwhile, the immune status depends greatly on the age of the host cat, the genetic makeups, and the level of stress. The virus can be slowed down more effectively when the host cat has a higher rate of immune status.

Diagnosis of Feline Infectious Peritonitis
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Diagnosis of Feline Infectious Peritonitis

In recent years, the diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), especially the effusive type, has been more straightforward due to advancement of technology. Effusive FIP is diagnosed through the presence of viral RNA within the effusion sample, observed through reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). This, however, means that a sample should have been delivered to an external veterinary laboratory. A number of tests exist in a hospital that will determine whether a case is a confirmed effusive FIP. The total protein in the effusion will be measured; it’s extremely unlikely to a case of FIP if it is less than 35 g/l. The ratio of globulin to albumin will be measured; FIP is ruled out if the ratio is more than 0.8 and is a possibility (if uncertain) if the ratio is less than 0.4. The presence of cells in the effusive will be examined; FIP is ruled out if the cells consist mostly of lymphocytes.

While it is rather easy to diagnose wet FIP, dry FIP is a different story. Wet FIP can simply be diagnosed through testing the effusion. Dry (non-effusive) FIP, however, is tricky for diagnosis due to its clinical signs being typically varied and vague and there would be no sample available for diagnosis. There will be much more variables to take into consideration when diagnosing dry FIP. Dry FIP is confirmed when the cat: 1) is young and purebred, 2) is stressed out due to recent experience, 3) has a bigger chance to get infected such as being originated from an indoor cat rescue homes, 4) shows the following traits: has become anorexic, eats less, experiences weight loss, has pyrexia, shows intra-ocular, and icterus, 5) shows hypergammaglobulinaemia, 6) shows lymphopenia, 7) and shows a higher level of antibody titre to FCoV—this last indication, however, should be used in caution as the test must be of its highest sensitivity to be regarded valid.

If the cat is seronegative, dry FIP can be ruled out but only if the test came with exceptional sensitivity. There has been a study that sought to compare a series of in-house FCoV antibody tests that are available commercially. The study eventually found out that the FCoV Immunocomb (biogal) is the best as it has 100% sensitivity; Virbac from the Speed F-Corona rapid immunochromatographic (RIM) is 92.4% sensitive, while the FASTest feline infectious peritonitis from MegaCor Diagnostik is only 84.6% sensitive.

An Introductory Entry on Feline Infectious Peritonitis
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An Introductory Entry on Feline Infectious Peritonitis

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a type of disease that occurs on a cat. It is a rare disease but when it does strike, it is typically fatal. The disease occurs as an abnormal response given by the body of a cat against the Presence of Feline Coronavirus (FCoV), the virus that causes the condition in the first place. FcoV typically attacks the gastrointestinal tract of a cat. Infections that take place subsequently are usually asymptomatic but in some cases they could cause diarrhea. This is especially true for kittens due to the natural antibody they derive from the mother gradually disappears at the age of around 5 and 7 weeks. FcoV mutates from Feline Enteric Coronavirus (FECV).

A big group of cats housed indoors together is commonly plagued with FcoV. As the virus gets dumped along with feces, some cats either ingest the virus or inhale it, infecting them in the process. The transmission is propagated by the use of shared litter trays or scoops or brushes that are already contaminated through which microscopic particles of cat litter are transmitted to healthy individuals. FcoV can also be transmitted through bodily fluids. Direct contact between cats can accommodate spread as well. The virus is commonly spread through saliva as most cats inside a house share the same dishes for water and food. It can also spread via fighting and grooming. When a healthy cat is groomed by an infected one, the former’s fur may be tainted with the latter’s saliva. When the healthy individual takes its time to groom itself, the contaminated saliva remains on their fur gets ingested, infecting it in the process.

An Introductory Entry on Feline Infectious Peritonitis

Effusive and non-effusive FIP are two most common forms of the disease. The two are fatal but the effusive type, in which 60-70% of cases are wet, undergoes rapid progression more than the other. Effusive FIP is also known as wet FIP because the presence of fluid that accumulates inside the abdomen or chest. This, in turn, can cause difficulty breathing. Diarrhea, jaundice, weight loss, fever, and lack of appetite are other common symptoms. Non-effusive FIP has the same symptoms as the other but without the presence of fluid. Signs of neurological and ocular disorders typically occur in a cat with dry FIP. According to situs, the disease may result in vision loss. The cat with dry FIP will also find it difficult to walk and will get functionally paralyzed over time.

Treatment of FIP
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Treatment of FIP

FIP (Feline Infectious Peritonitis) is a disease of immune-mediated nature. Because of this, treatment for cats coming down with it can be categorized into two groups: action directed against the virus causing the disease and the modulation of the immune response. There are antiviral drugs that can be used to treat FIP.

The most common of these drugs are either human interferon or feline recombinant interferon omega such as Virbagen Omega or Virbac. Interferon drugs have action that is specific to species. This makes feline interferon a more effective treatment option than that of human. A field trial involving 20 cats took place using an experimental antiviral drug by the name of GC 376. Seven subjects were cleared while the other 13 were eventually euthanized after responding shortly to the treatment. As of this writing, the drug has yet to be available commercially.

Sass and Sass experimented with a PI (polyprenylimmunostimulant). Dr. Al Legendre tested the treatment and discovered that three cats with FIP survived for more than a year after being treated. Another field study of 60 cats with non-effusive FIP involved said PI found out that 52 cats died from the disease before 200 days while the other 8 survived for more than 200 days. Four of the subjects, however, managed to continue on living for more than 300 days.

Prevention of FIP can start with an intra-nasal FIP vaccine. The use of this vaccine is considered controversial but a study showed that it may help protect cats against the disease: Vaccinated cats had little to no FVoV antibody titres. The vaccine fails in some cats perhaps because of preexisting infection. The safety and effectiveness of the vaccine have no substantial evidence, however.

There have been studies conducted from test the vaccine and they all showed that the vaccine may or may not work. The vaccine is not guaranteed to work one hundred percent of the time because it affects cat in different ways due to genetic makeups and the fact that the disease has different forms. Maternally derived antibody protects a kitten against infection until it wanes when the kitten is about the age of 5-7 weeks. Removal of said kitten from the source of the infection can help prevent the disease from spreading. Rigorous hygiene, however, is urgently required as a form of prevention considering the fact that the virus causing FIP, FCoV, is very contagious.

Two Things You Need to be Aware from FIP in Your Cat
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Two Things You Need to be Aware from FIP in Your Cat

FIP, which is also known as Feline Infectious Peritonitis is considered as one of the most dangerous that a cat can simply acquire. That is because this kind of disease is one of those few disease with no cure at all. If you are asking why there is no cure for FIP yet, then it might be caused by the fact that FIP is quite rare, about one case in a thousand cats. Despite of those things mentioned earlier, there are two main things that you need to be aware of related with FIP. Here are all of them.

The first one is the fact that this kind of cat disease has zero survival rate. This one is the most important thing that you need to highlight. That is because if you have a cat with FIP, you can be sure that the cat will die soon enough. It does not matter what kind of treatment that you choose for your cat, if the cat has FIP, it will die within the next two months or less. At least, two months are the maximum time that some of those cats have after receiving quite a lot of medical treatments for the FIP.

The next one is the fact that FIP is airborne. This is one thing that not all of those people have known. If you have more than one cat in your house and you are a bit late to realize the FIP in one of your cat, you need to isolate all of your cats as soon as possible. You need to take them to the doctor and ask if any of those cats were infected. There is a chance, even though the chance is small. Make sure you are careful with that or you might lose all of your cats at once.

The Rare Cat Disease Name Feline Infectious Peritonitis
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The Rare Cat Disease Name Feline Infectious Peritonitis

The Rare Cat Disease Name Feline Infectious Peritonitis – Cat is one of those pets that many people love to have. That is the main reason why many people have cat has the pet. Unfortunately, there is one rare kind of disease that can only attack cat. The name is Feline Infectious Peritonitis.

Many people know the name of Feline Infectious Peritonitis as FIP. For your information, this kind of disease is considered as something rare because it only happens in one of those thousands cats. As an addition to that, this kind of disease in cat is something very dangerous. The main reason is because of the low survival rate of the cat with FIP.

If you are talking about the survival rate of this kind of disease, then you will be shocked to know that none of those cats with FIP has ever survived. Fortunately, the case of FIP in cat is considered as something rare. That means not all of those cats will die because of FIP.

Even though there are a lot of scientists that have done a lot of experiments to find the main cause of this disease, there is still no clear answer for this kind of disease. That is very unfortunate because many people with, especially the cat lovers, are waiting for the cure for this kind of disease.

The only thing that many of the scientists have learned is that the disease is caused by the mutation of the corona virus that can be found inside the body of the cat. The main question that still not answered yet is how the corona virus can be mutated inside the body of the cat. If the scientist can answer that question, then it might be a good hope to find the cure or medication for the FIP. We just need to wait about the next step that all of the scientist will take.

Understanding What Infectious Feline Peritonitis Is
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Understanding What Infectious Feline Peritonitis Is

Feline Infectious Peritonitis is one kind of disease that you can find in a cat. Unfortunately, the disease in the cat is considered as one of those rarest kind of disease. That is one main reason why there are not many people or cat lovers who have known this kind of disease. If you are one of those cat lovers who have never heard about this kind of disease, then you will need to know some of this things related with FIP.

The first one is the survival right. When you are talking about the survival rate of the cat with FIP, the answer is zero. This is something that you cannot deny because based on the few cases of FIP in the world, none of those cats has ever survived. The second one is the time that cat has left.

Based on all of those FIP cases in the world, most of those cats have less than two months to live. As a addition to that, those cats that have more than 4 weeks left had the extensive treatments. That means if you do not take your cat to the doctor, then your cat will not be able to live for more than 4 weeks.

The next thing that you need to know about IP at this kind of disease can be airborne. Yes, this is one thing that many of those people missed. If you own more than one cat in your house, then you will need to be careful if one of those cats has the FIP. That is because the other cats might also have the FIP too. Therefore, it is better for you to isolate cat with positive FIP. This one is done to make sure that the other cats in your house did not get contaminated with the same disease.

Zero Survival Rate of Cats Disease Called FIP
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Zero Survival Rate of Cats Disease Called FIP

Many people love cats because of many reason. Some of them love the cats because of its hair. The orders love it because of the cuteness. Unfortunately, even though many people love this kind of animal to be their pet, there is something that they need to deal with. It is the FIP. FIP stands for Feline Infectious Peritonitis. This is the kind of disease that can only attack cats. If you think that FIP is just a common and normal disease for a cat, then you are totally wrong. That is because this kind of disease is very dangerous because the survival rate of this kind of disease in cat is zero.

For your information, one of the reasons why the survival rate of this FIP diseases is because there is no details about this disease. The only thing that has been known about FIP is the fact that the disease is cost by the mutation off Corona virus inside the body of a cat. Basically, corona virus is not that dangerous. However if the corona virus has mutated it can surely result in FIP. If a cat has earned the FIP, this one absolute thing that the cat will die within few weeks.

For those who worry about their cat, there are actually two kinds of symptoms of FIP that you can see in your cat. The first one is the increasing size of their belly. When their belly size is increasing but they become skinnier, that is one real sign of FIP that you need to be aware.

The next one is the injured body parts. If you have taken a good care of your cat then you who like will notice that there are no injured body parts at all. However, if your cat has FIP then it is one sure thing that you will find some injuries in some parts of your cats body.

Most Common Signs of Feline Infectious Peritonitis in a Cat
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Most Common Signs of Feline Infectious Peritonitis in a Cat

Cat is one of those pets that many people love to have. Unfortunately, there is one kind of disease in cat that can be considered as something totally rare and deadly. It is Feline Infectious Peritonitis. For your information, the Feline Infectious Peritonitis is one kind of disease in cat caused by the mutation of the corona virus inside the body of the cat. Unfortunately, the main cause of the mutation is still unknown so that there are no specific details about the prevention method of this Feline Infectious Peritonitis. However, there are still some common signs from this kind of disease in a cat that you can easily see. By knowing all of those common symptoms, you will be able to give the better treatments to your cat with the Feline Infectious Peritonitis.

The first one is fat belly. Fat belly is one thing that many people love from their cat. However, if your cat has a fat belly and the other parts of its body are getting skinnier, then you need to be careful with that. That is because one sign of Feline Infectious Peritonitis in a cat is the increasing mass of fat around the belly while the mass of the other parts are decreasing. That is why the belly will look totally big while the legs, the neck and the face are getting skinnier.

The second sign is the losing of appetite. For information, when a cat acquires the Feline Infectious Peritonitis, it will lose its strength in many parts of its body, including the mouth area. As the result, the cat will feel the pain when it is chewing on the food so that it will lose its appetite. When a cat is losing its appetite, you can be sure that the cat will move slower because it does not have any strength left to move.

The last but not least, it is the wound. This one is the easiest one to see because if you take a good care of your cat, you will not find any wound. However, if your cat has the Feline Infectious Peritonitis, it is definite that your cat will have some wounds in some parts of its body. Unfortunately, if your cat has this kind of sign, then it might be a bit too late because most of the cats that show this kind of sign died in less than a month. Therefore, pay full attention on all of those signs.

Things Many Cat Lovers Missed from Feline Infectious Peritonitis
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Things Many Cat Lovers Missed from Feline Infectious Peritonitis

If you are a cat lover, you surely have known that Feline Infectious Peritonitis is one dangerous disease that will kill your lovely cat within less than three months. That is why this kind of disease is considered as one of those most dangerous disease in cat. Fortunately, the case is quite rare. Even though, you cannot simply ignore the fact that Feline Infectious Peritonitis is one dangerous disease for your cat. For your information, even though you are a cat lover, there are some things about Feline Infectious Peritonitis that even many cat lovers missed. Here are some of them.

The first one is zero tolerant. If you think that this kind of disease can be cured if you have a lot of money, you are totally wrong. Based on the number of cases of Feline Infectious Peritonitis in the world, none of those cats survived. That means even though you have spent millions of dollars for your cat, your cat will die anyway. All of those treatments will only expand the life of your cats in a matte or weeks. Because of that reason, pick the proper treatment that will not take all of your money away. The next thing is the fact that Feline Infectious Peritonitis is airborne. 

This is something that many of them missed. You need to know that the healthy cats can be infected with the Feline Infectious Peritonitis when they are close. That means if you raise some cats at the time and one of them has the Feline Infectious Peritonitis, you might need to check all of your cats. That is because there is a great potential that the other of your cats are also infected, especially if your cat already has it for more than a week.

The last thing that many of those cat lovers in missed from Feline Infectious Peritonitis is that many of them thought that the signs of Feline Infectious Peritonitis are quite okay to experience. If you are a real cat lover, even the smallest problems might lead you to take your cat to the doctor. Unfortunately, not all of the cat lovers do the same thing and some of them even let their cats just like that because the signs of the Feline Infectious Peritonitis are quite common. To make sure that you are not going to kill your cat, be fully cautious with all of the possible signs of Feline Infectious Peritonitis in your cat.

Things You Need to Understand from Feline Infectious Peritonitis
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Things You Need to Understand from Feline Infectious Peritonitis

Many people have known that Feline Infectious Peritonitis is one of those rare disease that can be acquired by cat. Many of them also realize that this kind of disease is quite dangerous so that there are no cats that have ever survived from this kind of cat disease. Even though, there are still quite a lot of things that many people missed from the Feline Infectious Peritonitis. Here are some of those things.

The first one is the zero survival rate. Many people think that there is still a chance to live for a cat with the Feline Infectious Peritonitis, even if it is totally small. However, that is one wrong opinion to have because the survival rate is really zero. That can be seen from the number of cases of cats with Feline Infectious Peritonitis that have never survived in the past. However, the time before the end of the life depends fully on the treatment that the owner give and this is the second thing that you need to understand. If you do not give any kind of special treatment to your cat while having the Feline Infectious Peritonitis, you can be sure than within less than a month your cat will die. However, if you give the proper treatment based on the condition of your cat, you might be able to extend its life up to two months. However, there are not many cats with Feline Infectious Peritonitis that can simply live more than two months.

The next thing that you that play need to understand is that this kind of disease is airborne. That means all of the cats near the infected cat might be infected too. That is why if you have a cat with the Feline Infectious Peritonitis, it is better for you to isolate the cat for the greater good of the other cats. The last but not least, you might want to also consider going to the specialist if you have seen the signs or symptoms of the Feline Infectious Peritonitis and ask for the proper inspection. That is because the virus cannot be easily detected using the normal or standard inspection. The deep inspection is needed to make sure if your cat has the Feline Infectious Peritonitis or not, even if the signs have been shows. Therefore, you need to pay a good attention to the health of your cat if you want to help your cat fighting the Feline Infectious Peritonitis.

Feline Infectious Peritonitis with Zero Chance of Survival
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Feline Infectious Peritonitis with Zero Chance of Survival

Life is something that many people have to thanks, even for a life of a cat. That is because life is totally precious. Unfortunately, in the past decade, there is a kind of disease in a cat called Feline Infectious Peritonitis. This one kind of disease is indeed something quite rare, but unfortunately, the survival rate from this kind of disease is total zero. Yes, it is not one percents or zero point five percents. It is an absolute 100 percents that the cat will never survive from Feline Infectious Peritonitis or FIP. That is why this kind of disease is considered as one really dangerous disease in a cat.

Basically, this kind of disease is caused by the mutation of the corona virus inside the body of the cat. Unfortunately, there are no specific details about the things that cause the mutation of the corona virus inside the body of the cat. as an addition to that, the spreading of this kind FIP is also believed can be done through the air so that it is advisable for you to isolate the your cat if your cat has the FIP. Fortunately, the Feline Infectious Peritonitis is not something that can be transferred to human. At least, from some cases all around the world, there is no harm for human at all. That is why you do not need to worry about being infected with this kind of disease. However, you still need to worry about the condition of your cat because in most of the cases, the chance of survival is zero and the cats can only live within the next few weeks, six is the most.

Feline Infectious Peritonitis with Zero Chance of SurvivalFor your final consideration, there are actually two main signs of the Feline Infectious Peritonitis that you can visibly see from a cat. The first one is the bigger belly with skinnier legs. This one is the real sign and it is totally easy to see. It is as if your cat is bloated, but the other body parts are getting skinnier. The second sign is the wound or injuries on some parts of the body. Most of the time, you can find the wounds around the area of the legs, the belly or the lower part of the neck. That is why you need to be aware if your cat has some wounds that cannot be cured within few weeks. That might be one sign of Feline Infectious Peritonitis that you should not miss.